Retro Reading: A Henry Fliess house plan from Canadian Homes and Gardens, March 1953

(Henry Fliess was the architect for many of the original homes in Don Mills. Although this specific plan isn’t one of them, it would be right at home on any one of DM’s winding streets. The following is typed verbatim from the article. )

“If yours is the average young Canadian Family you probably wish a dozen times a day for a roomy, economical house that becomes even roomier as the children grow.

Here at last is the answer: Select Home No 7. Architect Henry Fliess designed this low-cost, two-bedroom house with space for a third bedroom to be finished when needed.

There’s a split level basement with space for that extra room and a downstairs washroom, too. As the family grows, you have a handsome bedroom overlooking the garden.

Though this is a simple, inexpensive (about $15,000) house it has that rare quality -space. Fliess achieved this with a “one-slope” roof which, in the living room, is exploited right up to the ceiling.

The house is designed for a 50 foot lot. With a wider lot you can build the carport at the side instead of the front, if you prefer. For a little more money you can install a fireplace indoors where bookshelves are now shown.”

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3 Responses to Retro Reading: A Henry Fliess house plan from Canadian Homes and Gardens, March 1953

  1. Dale R. Ford says:

    I am researching an estate property in Kitchener, ON it was built by Harvey J. Sims, who had acquired 45 acres of land to design as his own private countryside home. The Sims Estate was built in 1929 and the park and gardens were designed by Humphrey S.M. Carver and his partner Carl Borgstrom.
    Sims called this “Chicopee” and the landscape design was featured in a copy of Canadian Homes and Gardens in 1933. If there is anyway to track this down and possibly get a copy of the original plan it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

  2. robert says:

    toronto reference library has all the old copies…amazing reading!!

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